PCFA Policy on Testing Asymptomatic Men for Prostate Cancer

Emerging evidence on the benefits and potential harms of testing and subsequent treatment of asymptomatic men for prostate cancer has led many interested parties around the world to revise their guidance on testing using the PSA, or blood, test and Digital Rectal Examination (DRE)1,2,3.

Prostate Cancer Foundation of Australia (PCFA) is currently working in partnership with Cancer Council Australia to develop national clinical guidelines on PSA testing and early management of test-detected prostate cancer. The guidelines are being developed using the National Health and Medical Research Council externally developed guidelines standards and procedures. It is expected that the guidelines will be published in late 2014.

In the meantime, PCFA retains its current advice which is that men over age 50, or 40 with a family history of prostate cancer, should talk to their doctor about testing for prostate cancer using the PSA test and DRE as part of their annual health check-up. Men should make an individual informed decision about testing based on the latest available evidence on the benefits and potential harms of testing and subsequent treatment for prostate cancer.

Approved by the PCFA National Board

8 August, 2013

 

References

  1. U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. Screening for Prostate Cancer: Final Recommendation Statement. AHRQ Publication No. 12-05160-EF-2. link
  2. Early Detection of Prostate Cancer: AUA Guideline. H. Ballentine Carter, Peter C. Albertsen, Michael J. Barry, Ruth Etzioni, Stephen J. Freedland, Kirsten Lynn Greene, Lars Holmberg, Philip Kantoff, Badrinath R. Konety, Mohammad Hassan Murad, David F. Penson and Anthony L. Zietman. American Urological Association 2013 link
  3. Early Detection of Prostate Cancer: European Association of Urology Recommendation: Axel Heidenreich, Per-Anders Abrahamsson, Walter Artibani, James Catto, Francesco Montorsi, Hein Van Poppel, Manfred With, Nicolas Mottet. European Urology 2013 link